Welcome to DGNHAS

Welcome to the latest version of the DGNHAS website, which is more accessible using mobile devices and more easily maintained than the earlier version.

All the content of the earlier version is available here, possibly in a new form and accessed in a different way. The main difference is in searching the website and gaining information on the contents of the online Transactions using TDGNHAS index cards. See the Searching page for more information.

General feedback and information on errors or omissions are welcome. Please e-mail the webmaster using the link on the Contacts page.

DGNHAS Meetings January

The Council feels that, given the current level of Covid-19 infection, it would be prudent to hold our talks via Zoom for the next month and then review the situation. There will therefore be no meetings at Dumfries Baptist Church Centre in January. The next meeting will be zoomed on 14 January when Professor Alistair Alcock (Arbigland House, Kirkbean) will speak on John Campbell, the Kirkbean Boy who Changed the World of Navigation.

James Brown Booklet

James Brown Booklet cover

Following the exhibition on James Brown and Knockbrex earlier this year at the Mill on the Fleet, Gatehouse-of-Fleet, a very informative and well-produced booklet has just been published, entitled James Brown:A Businessman of Many Passions.

Stones and Stories

Stories and Stones book cover

Stones and Stories: some medieval monuments in Eastern Dumfries by Peter F Ryder FSA is a well-illustrated and extensively researched survey of cross and grave-slabs from eastern Dumfriesshire, published by Broomlee Publications in A5 format, 62 pages in length, with black and white drawings and some colour photographs. It is a companion volume to The Medieval Cross Slabs of the Borders by the same author (available from the Berwickshire Naturalists' Field Club.

The Resort of All Amorous Couples

Tollhoude book cover

The Resort of All Married Couples is a new book by Alverie Weighill, the Society's Treasurer.

The book describes how Thomas Telford’s 1820 toll-house at Gretna came to be built and how it became part of Gretna’s infamous marriage trade. Based on original sources and contemporary accounts and placed in the context of nineteenth-century Gretna, it traces the house’s history from the turnpike and stagecoach era, through two World Wars, to its present role in the Gretna story.